Jack Garratt, Music New Album, Love, Dancing & Death, TotalNtertainment

Jack Garratt new album is out June 12th

“I wrote this album as someone – and for anyone – who likes dancing but doesn’t necessarily want to go out on a Saturday. It’s dance music for people who don’t want to go out” – Jack Garratt

Jack Garratt is very pleased to share details of his second album and his first new music since 2016.

‘Love, Death & Dancing’ will be released on the 12th June 2020 through Island Records. The music is performed solely by Jack, and produced alongside Jacknife Lee and James Flannigan. It is available for pre-order HERE

The record is preceded today by the sharing of three new songs, Vol. 1, Jack’s first new music since 2016’s ‘Phase’ LP.

Jack Garratt accompanies this deeply personal album with an equally reflective long-form visual piece, ‘Love, Death & Dancing – a film by Jack Garratt’, of which the first instalment ‘Time’ is out now on all major video platforms. View it below.

Listen to Vol. 1, featuring ‘Time’, ‘Mara’, and ‘Return Them To The One’

In February, Jack headed out on a UK and European ‘Work In Progress’ tour to preview the new songs out on the road, ahead of further headline dates later in the year.

“I wrote this album as someone – and for anyone – who likes dancing but doesn’t necessarily want to go out on a Saturday. It’s dance music for people who don’t want to go out” – Jack Garratt

If Jack Garratt wasn’t a musician, he’d make a mean critic. A detractor of his music could throw a brickbat at him but Jack will always have got there first. Ask him now about his 2016 debut album ‘Phase’ and the 28-year-old doesn’t pull his punches, describing it as “busy and erratic”, “clever bullshit … a record full of beautiful metaphor that doesn’t really say anything. I was scared to actually say something real; I didn’t think people wanted to hear it. That’s why my production on that record is so busy, so saturated.” Yup, he’s down on the production, too. “I didn’t think I was a good producer, so I did lots of tricks to make people think: ‘He’s good.’ Same with the lyrics, with the melodies, all of it: it was just me on a face-value level effectively going: ‘This is good because it’s impressive, not because it’s actually good.’”