Red Rum Club, Music, The Elevation, New Release, TotalNtertainment

‘The Elevation’ new release from Red Rum Club

Positive to a fault and to the bitter end, the band looks ahead to a heavy schedule of live engagements from August onwards.

Red Rum Club kept the fire of hope burning through last year with their festival-in-the-front-room singles, including The Elevation. Now that track becomes the latest to be drawn from the band’s ice-cool, unplugged album, The Hollow Sessionsreleased at the end of April on Modern Sky, kick-starting a year of new activity for the main stage-ready six-piece.

Already steaming hot with anticipation for a colossal, 30-date UK Tour later this year, including rearranged dates on the road with Circa Waves, plus post-vax festival appearances at Sound City and Neighbourhood Weekender, the band took UK Lockdowns 1 and 2 as the opportunity to head back into the studio. Drawing a line under a stellar two years, which has seen them release two albums, Matador and The Hollow Of Humdrum, the band put twelve of their most-loved tunes to the acoustic test.

As with previous stripped-back single, Eleanor, it’s The Elevation’s turn to cast off its cloak of bravado and set a scene that’s altogether more relaxed. Noted as the band’s ‘WhatsApp Anthem’, the track’s lyrics tell a story of serotonin-rushing instant messaging and chasing a source of infatuation into the night via the screen of a smartphone. If that was the sound of tension on the dancefloor, Red Rum Club are now swilling a strong, short drink in the chill out room.

The Hollow Sessions will be released digitally on Fri 30 April 2021, with the band promising more surprises and announcements on new music in the very near future.

Fran Doran, the band’s front man, says“The lyric ‘the ticks turn blue’ gives the most obvious indication as to what ‘The Elevation’ is all about – waiting, often pathetically, for a sign that your message has been read and your emotions hanging on that outcome. It’s been a real treat for us to go back to this song, and the others, to give the words and core of the tune air to breathe.”